Black Out Curtains, Sleep Shade
Gives Cancer Protection
...and more!
(Part 2)

(Continued from Part 1)

The benefits of black out curtains, sleep shades, and sleep masks for reducing the risk of breast cancer for women was discussed in part one. This page focuses on how a melatonin sleep aid can help reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

Artificial Light & Prostate Cancer
An article citing a University of Haifa study, published in 2009, by Science Daily, "Artificial Light At Night: Higher Risk of Prostate Cancer, study states".

"At the very first stage of the study, it already became clear that there is a marked link between the incidence of prostate cancer and levels of night time artificial illumination and electricity consumption. Several different methods of statistical analysis were used to arrive at this conclusion."

Attention: All men susceptible to prostate cancer.

Be sure you read the full article here to reinforce why you too should plan to either wear a sleep shade (eye mask) or install black out curtains.

In addition to darkening your bedroom with black out curtains or a sleep mask, following a healthy diet, exercising, getting a good night's sleep every night and not smoking will help reduce the risk of many of the major diseases including cancer.

If you have or have had prostate cancer, research is indicating that there is delicious solution that you might want add to your health-promoting 'tool chest'.


More Ways to
Combat Prostate Cancer

Eat or Drink Pomegranate
If prostate cancer concerns you, a pomegranate a day ("pomme" -- French for apple) might just keep more than the doctor away.

These three studies suggest pomegranate as a solution for combating prostate cancer:

1) Allan Pantuck, M.D., director of cancer research at UCLA, specializes in prostate research. With no other treatment, he studied 50 men with recurring prostate cancer and previous surgery or radiation.

For the study they drank 8 oz. of pomegranate juice each day. Within weeks, their PSA levels were stabilized and doubling times were increased four-fold (short doubling times increase death risk). The results also showed a decrease in cancer cell growth (12%) and increase in cancer cell death (17%).

2) In their study, the National Cancer Institute concluded that foods containing ellagic acid (such as in pomegranates) can block aromatase, an enzyme which produces estrogen and prostate cancer cell growth.

3) The University of Quebec in Canada research also showed that pomegranates can inhibit estrogen production. In this case, it was the punicic acid in pomegranates that inhibit the aromatase enzyme.

All indications suggesting that pomegranate can help delay prostate cancer and the need for more invasive procedures.

* * * * *

Eat Your Pumpkin Seeds

While you're carving the pumpkin for Hallowe'en or baking a fresh pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving, don't throw out the seeds ... eat them!. Here's why:

Men, you need to know about these two critical health benefits of pumpkin seeds:

1) Pumpkin seeds are a good source of zinc. Men over 30 lose 1.5% of testosterone levels every year. Zinc protects the prostate and stimulates sex drive by ensuring healthy testosterone levels.

Supplementation of zinc in zinc-deficient normal elderly men for six months resulted in an increase in serum testosterone. (Nutrition Volume 12, Issue 5, Pages 344-348, May 1996)

2) Scientists have found cucurbitacin, an active ingredient in pumpkin seeds provides powerful anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory protection for infection, inflammation and cancer. (http://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pubmed/12445672)

Be sure to 'treat' yourself next Hallowe'en & be thankful for pumpkin seeds' many health benefits at Thanksgiving and the year through!


Black Out Curtains vs. a Sleep Mask?

BestEverSleep Mask

However, prevention is your best medicine. Be sure to sleep in a totally darkened bedroom, either with black out curtains or a sleep mask. A sleep mask is the most affordable solution ... the BestEverSleep Mask is available online for only US$10.00, including shipping and handling. It's lightweight, velvety soft on the face, effectively blocks out light (even daytime light); ideal for traveling ... blocks out unwanted lights in airplanes or hotel rooms with ill-fitting window coverings (most hotels); and it promotes natural melatonin production in your own bedroom.


How do you know if your bedroom is dark enough?
If you wake in the a.m. (anytime pre/post dawn) and you can see any light seeping in around your window coverings or under closed doors, then you need to install blackout drapes or use an eye mask nightly!

Try it -- for the health of it!

Also see: Is artificial light suppressing your melatonin protection?


For information on reducing breast cancer risk, go to Black Out Curtains, Sleep Shade (Part 1)

See Sleep Hygiene tips for improved vitality and health

Sleep Masks
...not just for beauty

Sleep Masks for Men
(see prostate benefits)


Sleep Masks for Mom
(see breast cancer article)


...And Loved Ones Insomniacs, shift workers, nappers, hospital patients


More fun and funky masks available here.


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In the News

sleep and cancer

Cushions for Oncology
BestEverSleep Cushions were recently donated to Toronto East General Hospital (Canada) to help improve patient comfort during chemotherapy treatments. 

Now Available Online!
The BestEverSleep Cushion, designed by a recovering insomniac to help others alleviate pain and improve their quality of sleep, health and vitality is now available online – at lowest prices ever!


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Another independent site, Bragada Mattress Company, has honored us by recommending their valued customers and visitors visit us: We're #3 in their Top 10 Best Sleep Blogs Ever

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... ranking close to renowned medical sleep experts at WebMD and sleep Dr. Michael Breus.